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our economy. >> reporter: republicans led by house speaker john boehner says he should quit campaigning and take care of the business at hand. republicans say they are willing to consider raising more revenue but they want to see spending cuts to go along with it. >> we need to hear they are willing to make spending cuts now, not promises of spending cuts sometime if the future. to me the tidal waves that are coming at us is social security and medicare and the new health care law. >> reporter: now house democratic leader nancy pelosi is calling the speakers to bring the tax to the floor by tuesday or she will try to force a vote. boehner is not likely to buckle under pressure so it seems like a standoff. >> gregg: sfuaf. what a surprise? they want to resolve this fiscal crisis or lack in his real compromise. john boehner is leading an attack on the lack of progress. >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. it was not a serious proposal. so right now we're almost nowhere. >> gregg: almost nowhere. how about that? staff writer for roll call joins us live. the preside
might be stuck. a senior administration official told us that president obama and john boehner had a phone wallace night and politico was reporting that the phone call was curt. they said on the call john boehner told the president to leave the tax cuts for the rich alone. the president says he doesn't want to do that. he's going to stick with his plan to raise $1.6 billion in revenue and if republicans have something better they should be specific now. eric cantor said republicans are already going further than they did in the same spot in 2010. >> we have done our part. we have put revenues on the table, something we didn't do two years ago during the debt ceiling negotiations. >> we've seen some positive developments in the last several weeks, in terms of what republicans have been saying about the need for revenue as part of a balanced package. the president will continue to make the case that that is essential. >> reporter: so both sides saying revenue is on the table, now the fight is obviously to figure out where it's going to come from, how the government is going to make m
tougher in going after speaker john boehner's latest proposal in saying it simply doesn't add up. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legislation to increase revenues. it's magic beans and fairy dust. >> the bottom line is the president and speaker boehner have not spoken now in several days. so there is really no signs of progress. there has been some discussion that look that's just happening in public. behind closed doors maybe they are gaining some ground, i have spoken to some top white house officials tonight some top republicans on the hill they say in private they are not making progress either, shep. >> shepard: republicans say they have offered some compromises. >> they have in the sense that speaker boehner with his policy late yesterday put $100 billion in new tax revenue on the table. that was a concession by him but not far enough as you noted for the white house because the white house wants him to not just raise tax revenue by limiting intuctions and loopholes and the like. they want to see tax rates go up but republic lea
? >> reporter: we heard from speaker john boehner who said that treasury secretary geithner did not come with a substantive plan in terms of spending cuts. we know the republicans were hoping when the treasury secretary came here to capitol hill, that he would have laid out some serious spending cuts because the republicans are saying if we're putting revenue on the table, we need to see some serious spending cuts from the white house. i think it's important to note the difference between what is said in public and what is said in private. these meetings are held in private. in public lawmakers are sounding a little tougher. here's the senate majority leader on the senate floor earlier today. >> for four months house republicans have refused to act. instead, they've held the middle class hostage to protect the richest 2% of taxpayers, people who enjoy a decade of ballooning income and shrinking tax bills. >> reporter: so that is the public sentiment from the senate majority leader, blasting the republicans for not passing the tax cuts for the middle class. in private, though, it sounds l
in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. >> reporter: at the white house. >> this is available not just here but to everyone in the world who has an internet connection. and i know things are done the old fashioned way sometimes on capitol hill, but i believe they have electricity and internet connections and they can get this. >> reporte
, it seems like both sides are moving further apart from the deal. here is house speaker john boehner and treasury secretary timothy geithner. >> we are flabbergasted. we have seven weeks between election day in the end of the year. three of those weeks have been wasted. >> we are not going to extend an extension of the tax rates. we think they need to go back to those levels. if you don't do that, you have to ask yourself, whose taxes are we going to raise? were we going to find the money bring a balanced plan in place? jenna: senator lindsey graham, a republican known for reaching across the aisle, not looking at this with a great deal of optimism. >> i think we're going over the fiscal cliff. it's pretty clear that they have made this happen. they are not saving social security and medicare and medicaid from imminent bankruptcy. jenna: james is live in washington with more. reporter: yes, what is clear is increasingly, the two sides -- the obama, white house, senate democrats on one side, senate republicans on the other, there is a ticking clock involved here. they should be hittin
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6